Radical Equality: 1842-1846

Glossary

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Education reform - Horace Mann was the leading advocate for the public school movement in the mid 19th century. People advocated for learning by doing models, moral education and the expansion of adult political education. New college formed during this era, such as Mount Holyoke. Adult education was also expanded through lyceum lecture societies that provided lecturers for local communities.
Educational Reform - Horace Mann was the leading advocate for the public school movement in the mid 19th century. People advocated for learning by doing models, moral education and the expansion of adult political education. New college formed during this era, such as Mount Holyoke. Adult education was also expanded through lyceum lecture societies that provided lecturers for local communities.
Egalitarian - A belief and political doctrine stating that all people should be treated as equals, and have the same political, social, economic, and civil rights.
Era of reform - Era in the 1830s, 40s, and 50s, when many different reforms attempted to change society. Movements in temperance, democracy, prison reform, education reform, women’s suffrage and abolitionism. By the 1850s, abolitionism became the dominant reform movement in American society. The reform movement stemmed from the Second Great Awakening.
Era of the Common Man - During the 1830s and 40s the participation of citizens in government increased through universal manhood suffrage, party nominating conventions, popular election of electors, rise in third parties, more elected offices, and popular campaigning. As a result of this increased democratic participation, the period becomes known as the Era of the Common Man.
Expanded democracy - Expanded democracy Reform aimed at increasing the participation of women and African-Americans in the political system.
Expansion of slavery - According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the slave population in the United States in 1790 was 697,897. By 1830, this number had risen to about two million. On the eve of the Civil War, the U.S. had 3.9 million slaves.